Ohio.gov  |   State Agencies   |   Online Services

Organizations Development Center

Latino Education Summit: Best Practices

Resources

Summit Agenda
Summit Participants

First Lady's Karen Kasich:

Message to Summit Participants

SEE IT IN ACTION

Cincinnati -
Latino Parents Group



El Puente Learning Center


The Learning Cafe


Presentations

Each  of the programs represents a successful practice in Ohio.  View  a general description of all best practices and then review the detailed presentation below.


El Puente Learning Center, Dayton
Hispanic Outreach Program, Springfield
The Hispanic Council, Cuyahoga Community College, Cleveland
Northern Kentucky University, Office of Latino Student Affairs
ECHHO: Educators and Com Helping Hispanics Onward
Ohio Department of Education: RttT - Race to the Top Program
The Ohio State University L.A.S.E.R. Program & College 101
Cincinnati Public Schools


CONVERSATIONS

Conversation Tables Summary Report
Working Matrix for Action Steps


The 2013 summit was  co-chaired by Senator Peggy Lehner of Kettering – Chair of the Ohio Senate Education Committee - and Senator Charleta B. Tavares – Commissioner on the board of the Ohio Commission on Hispanic/Latino Affairs.  The event gathered administrators, students, teachers, leaders and member from each of the Ohio school districts with the highest enrollment of Hispanic students.   Key agencies and organizations that play an important role in improving the delivery of service to Ohio’s Hispanic students presented  best practices and identified which of those best serve Hispanic students and which can be duplicated to improve service around the State.

Hispanics are the fastest-growing demographic group in the state of Ohio.  Ohio’s Hispanic population jumped more than 63% from 2000-2012.  Ohio Hispanics are also a relatively young group, which means the enrollment of Hispanics at Ohio schools has increased dramatically.  Still, there are problems.  Despite increased presence in Ohio schools, Hispanics students struggle at greater rates than do their demographic peers.  Scholastic achievement and college attendance rates are lower among Hispanic students than among their peers and in some districts as many as 70% of Hispanic students drop out of school before finishing their diplomas.  By bringing Ohio public school administrators, teachers, students and key agencies together we hope to foster dialogue on the reasons for these educational disparities and practical solutions to resolve them.